JUKI’s Holiday Gift Guide

As the holidays get closer, we start thinking about those special people in our lives and what gift we will get them this year! If you have a quilter or sewist in the family, and you’ve been dreaming of getting them the perfect machine, follow along as we recommend our favorite devices depending on their project focus! From home decor creators to quilters and fashion garment designers, JUKI is here to help you find a suitable machine for your loved one this holiday season.

For the Fab Home Decorators

Buying the right gift for your creative friends can be difficult when you need help figuring out what to get them! So if you have a creator who focuses on home décor projects, we recommend our favorite home décor machine and accessories they would love!

If you’re looking to buy your loved one a sewing machine this holiday, the DX-2000QVP is perfect for home decorators! From decorative pillows to table runners and quilts, this machine can help them easily create their next project. Filled with sought-out features that beginners and advanced sewists will appreciate, like our JUKI Box Feed that moves your fabric for you, the floating button to prevent uneven seams, and comes with an assortment of presser feet that will help them bring their projects to life.

Does your loved one already own a DX machine? Then, upgrade their accessories kit and help them create new projects with a JUKI Creative Set! The Creative Set offers sewists a set of presser feet perfect for embellishing and adding decorative touches to their designs. This set includes pieces like the Applique Presser Foot, Cording and Embroidery Presser Foot, Pearl Attaching Presser Foot, Cording Presser Foot (for 3 Cords), Presser Foot with Guide, and Open Toe Presser Foot!

For Your Favorite Fashion Designer

Have a fashion designer in your life? Check out the Sayaka DX-3000QVP for their holiday gift! When creating fashion, designers are always ready to get creative and add personal touches to their work. With a machine like the DX-3000QVP, creators now have access to 351 stitch patterns, including beloved zigzags, 20 professional buttonholes, and four lettering fonts! They can bring their ideas to life with options like that while adding those personal touches they love.

The DX also offers a large workspace with a 12″ throat space for creating large projects like dresses, pants, and more. They’ll also enjoy a color touch panel where ease of use helps them change settings such as thread tension, presser foot pressure, pivot function, drop feed system, and automatic thread trimming with one touch. Add in free motion quilting, an Interchangeable Straight Stitch Feed System, and JUKI Smart Feed, and beginner and advanced sewists alike will love what they can create.

For sewists who have been dreaming of a serger, the MCS-1700QVP is the best of both worlds! Offering both coverstitch and chain stitch, this 3- and the the 4-thread machine is perfect for creating numerous projects like blouses, dresses, swimming suits, and athletic wear, thanks to how easy it is to work on stretch fabrics! In addition, strong chain stitch sections like waist seams and pants side seams become sturdier and cleaner.

If you’re looking to help them upgrade their sewing kit, we recommend our Invisible Zipper Foot and Double Fold Bias Binder! The Invisible Zipper Foot for the DX Series is perfect for adding that professional touch to their fashion pieces, where dresses, jackets, and even bags can now have a cleaner look. The Double Fold Bias Binder, created for the MCS machine series, can help fashion creators easily make straps for their camisole pieces or automatically fold the fabric to bind the garment edges for details like a neckline.

For the Quilters in Your Life

Quilters are always looking for more space to create! With the Miyabi J-350QVP, you can help them create a workspace that measures from 5 feet to 12 feet, where they can easily create quilts up to king size. In addition, this quilting machine offers features like our built-in JUKI SmartStitch titch regulator system, where quilters can produce accurate, precise stitching at any speed, helping them create beautiful designs and art. In addition, you can add Quilter’s Creative Touch 5 (QCT5) which allows you to easily design, lay out your quilt projects, and leave the machine to do the stitching for you!

If your loved one doesn’t have the space for a stand-up machine like the Miyabi J-350QVP, we recommend checking out the J-150QVP! The J-150QVP is the best of both worlds as it offers the space and free motion feature needed for quilting while also being a straight stitch machine that can help them complete their quilt in one space. Furthermore, with its digital screen, it is easy to change settings, the tension, speed, box feed system, lock/backstitch count, and more!

Finally, if your quilter already has their holy grail machine, check out JUKI’s newest quilting accessory! Our Free Motion Quilting Rings come in two sizes, 8″ and 11″, and offer creators the chance to add beautiful stitching with improved guidance by providing no-slip bottoms and using durable high-density polyurethane (HDPE) construction. Quilters tired of moving their quilt around as they add free motion quilting will love the ease of using this accessory the next time they’re creating!

For the Bag Creators

Finally, if you’re looking for the perfect gift for the bag creators in your life, look no further than the Haruka TL-18QVP! This single-needle, lock-stitch, portable sewing machine is built with industrial-quality sewing, helping creators with large projects create peace. No more fighting with the sewing machine because of heavy or thick material! This machine is equipped with our industrial mechanisms and features a float foot function that is great for many layers and thick seams that handbag-making needs.

Other features sewist will love about this machine is the brightness adjustment of the light and the drop feed for adding embroidery or free-motion quilting. In addition, this sub-tension unit ensures stitches are sewn with balanced thread tension and an automatic needle threader and thread trimmer!

If your bag creator has already found their perfect machine, help them upgrade their sewing kit with the Professional Attachment Set for the TL Series! This set of 3 presser feet and gauge is ideal for bag creators because it allows them to use more sewing techniques like working with leather and vinyl, attaching decorative piping and zippers, and working with a fixed seam allowance. The Hinged Zipper Foot is perfect for those narrow zippers they want to attach to your bag. A smooth foot will help them create using fabrics like vinyl and leather. The piping foot will help them easily create and attach pipping to their bags. Lastly, the swing gauge is used as a guide for the edge of the fabric when sewing with a fixed seam allowance.

We hope you find the perfect gift for your loved one this holiday season! Whether you’re choosing a machine or adding to their sewing kits, sewist and quilters alike will always love having new items for their sewing room. If you’re looking for help choosing the best gift for your friend or family member, contact your local JUKI Dealer; you can reach them by visiting us here!

JUKI Small Business Seminar: Tips and Tricks to In-Person Sales

With in-person sales making a comeback to our communities, in-person sales have seen a rise in popularity. A big reason for this is that it’s easier to build trust with customers. In addition, in-person sales help you handle their objections and see their emotions, allowing you to make sales you might have missed otherwise. 

In-person sales is another opportunity to get your business out there and bring in those sales you want. Today, we’ll dive into in-person sales and what tools and resources you need to know about before starting. 

Benefits of Selling in Person

When you first start your business, a large percentage of your sales will come from in-person sales because customers are more likely to trust a company they can physically build rapport with than an online one they would have to research and read reviews. 

With in-person sales, you can truly pitch and sell your product. Unlike online sales, where you can’t catch those moments when a customer is frustrated, disinterested, or bored with your product, an in-person sale allows you to capture their emotions and verbal cues to bring the customer back in. It’s also easier to keep their attention once you have it than online, where the customer can switch between tabs and lose interest.

Keep in mind that this form of sales is more time-consuming and takes extra effort. So, with a limited amount of time and resources at your disposal, you need to set aside the hours to attend farmers’ markets, shops, and booths, while allocating your stock and ensuring you’re ready for a low or high volume of sales.

Selling in person also brings in the possibility of other team members dealing with rude or upset customers face to face. If you’re hiring sales representatives to assist with your in-person sales, you’ll need to consider finding, hiring, training, and even possibly firing sales representatives. You’ll also experience good and bad moments with possible customers, where some can be rude when turning down your product. However, don’t let these small things hold you back, as selling in person can be one of the best ways to get yourself out there.

Farmer’s Market

Farmer’s markets can be seen as a step towards setting your booth in conventions and tradeshows. A smaller-scale setup, farmer’s markets are perfect for getting in touch with your local communities and building up your skill for in-person sales. Follow along as we go over some tips to keep in mind before attending or registering for your first farmers market.

  1. Research!

Like anything you do for your business, you’ll want to research before applying to attend a farmers’ market. First, look into what farmers’ markets best fit your niche and see what kind of crowds they bring in. The best way to do this is to attend the local markets as a customer and see what vendors are present and who’s shopping.

Chat with the vendors already attending to learn more about the market’s atmosphere and what kind of shoppers like to attend. In addition, speak with the organizers while you’re there to understand better how to attend, what rules they have for sellers, and more.

Be on the lookout for fees as well. Depending on your local farmers market, booths might be rented out every week or may require a longer commitment, in which case you would be placed in a deal for up to 6 months. Booth fees are generally charged per day and range anywhere from $20 to $50 or more. Remember to look into your state ordinances and any necessary licenses or certifications required for selling in farmer’s markets.

2. Preparing Your Booth

Farmer’s markets tend to offer small booths and areas. Keep this in mind when planning your booth and take the time to complete a dry test run, create a detailed checklist for what you’ll need, and don’t forget the personal essentials.

A dry test run is completed by setting up your booth at home and placing everything as if it was the day of the Market. By doing this, you’ll get an idea of how you want your layout. What products can come with and which ones should stay, and what inventory you’ll need to bring along.

Your checklist should consist of your products, services if needed, customer essentials like receipts and credit card readers, and essentials to keep you and your team going. Remember to pack things like food, drinks, and items like sunscreen so that you’re prepared for the hours ahead.

3. Products and pricing

When shoppers attend farmer’s markets, they want to know the pricing and available products. Make sure to correctly display your products in unique ways like flyers or brochures, so customers have a clear idea of what you’re selling. When it comes to pricing, use clearly labeled stickers. 

Having a consistent system when it’s time to complete a purchase is also important. Ensure you have a clear area for handling purchases and the right tools on hand if you’re accepting cards or cash. If you offer bags for customers, make sure to have those nearby and ready

4. Booth Extras

Farmers’ markets can be busy, which means you may not reach every customer as they walk by. For these occasions, it’s great to keep things in your booth that customers can reference when you can’t get to them. Think of setting up an FAQ poster, have a video or photos playing somewhere to showcase making your products or doing your services, and create a flow to your booth if you’re selling products that can complement one another. Your booth setup can help you upsell when done right, so take the time to figure out what extras you can integrate into your design.

Trade show & conventions

One of the best ways to get your business out there and to the right niche is by attending trade shows and conventions that correlate with your product or niche market. By attending these shows and spreading the word about your business, you can bring in new customers that attend these events. You can also take these events as an opportunity to network with other companies in your niche and introduce yourself to competitors or possible collaborations. Below are five things to keep in mind when you start looking into attending your first trade show or convention.

  1. Research!

A tradeshow is like a window into your small business, what you offer, and who you are. Make sure to research the tradeshow you want to attend to get an idea of how many are commonly in attendance, how many vendors will be attending, if there will be events held during the convention, and so much more like possible vendor product giveaways.

Keep in mind the competitors visiting the same convention you’re interested in. Then, when customers come up to your shop, you can compare your product to others, explain the differences and benefits of yours, and build that trust and credit with your knowledge.

2. This is a Sales Pitch

Keep in mind that attending these shows is a 24/7 sales pitch. You have to be “on” at these events like other shops, and customers come up to your booth with questions, inquiries, and more. A convention is like being in a constant sales pitch, so if you’re still getting comfortable with this aspect of public speaking for your small business, take some time to attend community events before attending a tradeshow or convention.

3. Don’t forget to Market!

Attending these events is the perfect chance to test your marketing skills. Jump on your social media, newsletters, and podcast to promote your business and attend these events so that current customers and possible buyers can attend! Promote your booth with a photo so shoppers know what to look for when attending.

4. Be Prepared

Remember to bring along marketing giveaways when attending these events. While this is the perfect opportunity to sell your products, this is also a chance to bring in returning customers or enjoy the power of word of mouth. By offering items like business cards, flyers, mini freebies, and more, you’re giving customers a way to contact you in the future for sales or the opportunity to share your business card with their friends and family. Make sure to include your contact information, website or storefront information, and any other information you think is essential.

Don’t forget to bring in branded items to decorate your booth so shoppers can know your brand and business name while browsing. This can go beyond having a tablecloth with your logo and include ideas like banners, flags, signage, and more. You want customers to know your company name and what you sell when they see your booth.

5. Prepare Your Booth

Beyond your marketing pieces and giveaway items, you’ll need to prepare your booth if you’re using them. Think of creative ways to sell your products by setting up demos, showcasing videos of you creating your product, or completing a service if that’s what your business offers. Look into ways of including the customer by providing product testing on-site so they can see your product in action. Think of your booth like a storefront, and make sure you’re prepared for when window shoppers walk by!

Star Small and Aim Big!

When you decide to start selling in-person, remember to start at a small scale like your local farmers’ and artisan’s markets before working your way up to conventions and tradeshows. Getting experience in in-person sales is important! You want to be able to handle questions, create demos, handle sales, and move comfortably so that you can build trust in your product and business when selling directly to your customers. Selling in person can be a whole new ball game for those uncomfortable with public speaking, so make sure to practice putting yourself out there and connecting with those in the community.

If you’ve sold your product in person before, what tips would you give to those just starting? Let us know in the comments below!

JUKI Spotlight: An Inappropriate Quilter with Leslie Bercher

Known for creating beautiful quilts, sharing tips and tricks for your sewing rooms, and her quilting podcast with co-host Rochelle Rice, we’re excited to spotlight Leslie Bercher, Quilter and podcast host for Inappropriate Quilters! Joining us for this month’s spotlight, we got to interview Leslie about her journey in quilting, the podcast’s beginning with co-host Rochelle, and how she created her brand.

It all started with Leslie’s grandmother, Helen. Helen was a member of a church that held Auxiliary Meetings where other members would quilt, crochet, and embroider. It took Leslie several years to watch her grandmother attend these meetings and see her create beautiful projects before picking up the hobby. So it was 2018 when Leslie, with two of her best friends, decided to take a class called ‘Quilt 101’.

“My first quilt was a log cabin, and I made two immediately. That was the beginning, and I haven’t looked back.”

Leslie began sharing her work online, finding a passion for creating and taking the time to build these quilts and designs. It was after a friend recommended she create a profile on social media, explaining she was missing out by not joining the online community when she opened her account. Opening herself up to the idea, she began posting and sharing her projects, excited to see how many beautiful quilters were out there in the world.

It was online that Leslie found a supportive community in her projects and offered her the opportunity to network and build relationships with new people! Consistently supporting one another in their ideas, and encouraging those who have lost their “sew-jo,” as Leslie says, has made the community, unlike any other group she’s been a part of.

This community has also been the inspiration for countless projects she’s created, inspired by other creators on social media. While not a modern quilter, she finds inspiration in all their designs picking from their color selections, patterns, and quilting textures. She also focuses on who she is creating, letting that drive much of the inspiration.

At one of these quilt retreats with the quilting community, she met Rochelle, someone who, according to Leslie, “has never met a stranger.” Leslie and Rochelle were placed in the same group, and their group’s theme was chickens! With their organized and over-the-top decorations, they couldn’t resist having a group mascot, Leon, the rubber chicken.

One day, during the retreat, Leon went missing! Leslie convinced Rochelle was to blame for the Rubber Duck disappearance, and she took it upon herself to ‘borrow’ Rochelle’s foot controller from her machine when she wasn’t looking. The joke would fall back on Leslie when Rochelle returned to the retreat the next day after a nice early night in, unaware her controller had been taken in the first place! They were fast friends after that, bonding over jokes and laughter.

 A couple of years later, the podcast topic would come up between the two friends. During a dream quilt vacation, a sewing retreat where two of their favorites, Camille Roskelley and Angela Walters, would attend, they were having breakfast when the idea popped into Leslie’s head.

With only an idea and some research, Rochelle purchased all the equipment while on their retreat and had it shipped to her home for when they arrived back in town. Excited about their new project, there was only one thing missing, a name! But, as their friends joined in on the conversation, one name stuck out. Walking away from their breakfast table, their friend Angela turned around and offered up “Inappropriate Quilters,” the perfect name for the inappropriate duo!

“Angela was getting up from the table and casually said, ‘oh, I know what you should name it. Inappropriate Quilters.’ We looked at each other and said, “that’s it!”

From there, the show project was on! Weekly episodes, released on Saturdays, became the norm where two quilting friends could join together to discuss life and quilting. With no script in hand, the two friends meet at Leslie’s studio weekly to record before she finishes editing and schedules the episodes Saturday morning. Finding their way into other quilters’ studios through their speakers, their show focuses on just two friends who love quilting, allowing listeners to feel like they have friends in the room with them when they’re creating.

One topic Leslie loves to cover is the process of creating and organizing your studio space. As quilters and sewists know, having a space that encourages creativity and allows you to move and build your projects is important! As an advocate for ‘Function and Beauty,’ we asked Leslie what recommendations she can offer to those building their studio space today.

“You have to start with function. But if it isn’t cute, it better have a very good reason to take up your space!”

What else can you find in Leslie’s studio? Her JUKI! With her Haruka TL-18QVP, named Camille after Camille Roskelley, Leslie has been able to create beautiful quilts and projects she loves. With 95% of her projects involving straight-stitch, she chose a machine that fit her needs. Her top three features at the time were: consistent straight stitch, an automatic thread cutter, and speed! Her best recommendation to sewists and quilters looking for a new machine is to focus on what features are important to you, figure out what type of stitches you plan to create with, the speed, and visit your local dealer! A local dealer can listen to everything you may want and offer machine recommendations and test-sewing.

Leslie’s quilting has opened up a community for her, allowing her to be creative, meet new people, and enjoy her hobby! As she’s transitioned to a content creator and business owner, we asked what advice she’d offer to someone trying to build their brand. “There are so many little things that you didn’t plan. Be gracious with yourself in the process.” Setting up the government business aspects of a shop, like tax ID, sales taxes, and even finding a partner, can be challenging, but the final product is worth it when you love what you do!

We’re so excited to continue seeing Leslies’ brand and content grow, especially with possible plans of opening a YouTube page for creators to join! Listening to feedback from the community she’s created is vital, and she trusts them to lead her toward new and exciting project ventures. So even with her reservations about being on camera, you can expect Leslie to meet her community in the middle and find a way to join the video world!

From quilting to running a podcast, we had a great time getting to know Leslie and going behind the scenes for her projects. If you’ve enjoyed getting to know Leslie and want to keep up with her and Rochelle’s podcast and future quilt projects, join us in following her socials and websites below!

Blog: read here!

Instagram: follow here!

Linktree: Find Leslies channels here!

YouTube: watch here!

Podcast: Inappropriate Quilters – available where you listen to podcasts

Inappropriate Quilters Shop: shop here!

Tips for Creating a Sewing or Quilting Video

When we first begin creating videos for our projects, we might not be sure where to start. Creating a video for our socials can go beyond the camera and your current project and step into pre-planning, long editing, and finding the right places to publish.

Today we’ll review tips and things to keep in mind when you want to shoot your next video! From planning your videos to editing, shooting, and posting, follow along as we go through the steps it takes to get your project video going.

What to Film?

Before we can step into the studio, let’s begin with brainstorming. It all starts with an idea! This idea doesn’t need to be perfect but think of a specific project you’d like to work on and create. From there, figure out the goal of your video.

For example:

  1. Is this video being created to present how to create a project for each step?
  2. Are you creating this video project to showcase a specific machine or accessory?
  3. Are you going behind the scenes?

Once you know why you’re creating this video, we can jump into the how.

Some ways you can plan your videos are scripting certain scenes, creating a storyboard that allows you to see what flow you want to make for your videos, and designing the production space and location. For scripting, think of certain spots like introductions, saying goodbye, or even a script for your whole video! The storyboard process can be as simple as breaking down your video into parts and seeing where you’ll be changing positions or locations to film. Once you find your filming location, ensured good lighting, low outside sounds, and a room that looks inviting to viewers, you can begin filming.

Deciding what projects to focus on can be difficult, but the great thing is you can always keep creating videos! Sometimes we’ll want to focus on a WOW project that can cost us big bucks and involve a lot of editing. Other times we might create a piece that is short, easy, and to the point. So choose a project you love doing, no matter what form of project or video you’re creating!

The Equipment

When you’re ready to begin filming, there are a few tools every studio should have. Some might think they need to start with a professional camera, but when you’re first beginning, a smartphone can be the best option! With any standard smartphone, you should be able to create excellent video content that can be used for YouTube videos, Instagram Reels, TikTok, and more.

However, if you have a budget and are ready to dive in and buy equipment, we recommend a few of the basics below.

  • Camcorder or DSLR
  • Camera lenses: These can be used for different shots. An example would be purchasing microlens for close-up shots of your needlework!
  • Memory cards: we recommend having a few on hand for those long shooting days.
  • Tripod or stabilizer: different versions can be purchased. You can find ones for tabletop views and bird-eye views.
  • Microphone: make sure you’re viewers can hear you well! We also recommend captioning your videos for viewers to follow along.
  • Lighting: Lighting can break or build a video! Proper lighting will help sewists see where you’re stitching, the needle, your stitch types, and more.

If you use your phone camera, you can still use this extra equipment! Multiple accessories will Bluetooth link to your phone for microphones and new lenses can be attached to your smartphone camera. Remember phone tripods and good lighting, and you’ll be creating your professional videos soon!

Recording Your Video

There is no real right or wrong way to filming, but there are tips for creating clean and fun videos! When it comes to filming, you want to start by allocating time for it. Filming time always depends on your projects, the angles you’re shooting at, and what your video storyboard is.

For example, if you’re shooting a quick tip video, that won’t require camera move changes or machine adjustments, it can take 15 minutes to film your new tip video and 10 to edit. Now, you have fun short videos for your followers and other sewists!

However, if you’re planning to create a project video like a garment piece, be prepared to allocate a larger amount of time for filming and post-production. Editing and the theme of your video style will change as you learn new techniques and features, but it’s best to create consistency in your videos for your viewers to follow. Whether it’s a standard opening sequence, the way you style the shots, or the theme of your projects, consistency is what begins to build a following.

Once you’ve planned your sewing space and managed your time, you can start setting up! The setup process is important when you’re creating because this will help build the momentum for your video and make the correct layout. Focus on lighting, how the sounds of your space are (are you getting a lot of outside noises in your film location?), and decide If you’ll be using a script so you can plan to have a mini prompter to read off, or finding a screen large enough to assist.

Lastly, do some test runs! Have fun and practice first by creating mock videos and testing your sewing location, audio, lighting, angles, and more. Then, once you feel you’re ready, go ahead and film your video!

Film Tips

  • If you’re shooting a sewing technique, use a lens like the micro one we mentioned above! Simple to use, this adjustment can help viewers get a better peak at the stitches you’re using, presser feet, and even stitch length!
  • Bird-eye/Overhead view can be your best friend when creating projects that otherwise wouldn’t be seen on a direct shot. For example, use bird eyes view when making garment projects or quilts to showcase how the projects are truly turning out.
  • Make sure to have your supplies and fabric ready to go before filming! We recommend pre-cutting, pre-washing (if needed), and setting up your workspace for viewers to see what supplies they’ll need while allowing you to be ready to go.
  • Include an opening and closing shot in your videos! This little detail will help viewers feel welcomed to your channel and give them an idea of what they’ll learn when they watch.

Post Production Time

Here comes the fun part! Once we’ve completed our filming, it’s time to move on to editing, planning, posting, and getting those posts and blogs ready. Of course, the first step is importing your video! A tip we recommend is organizing your footage before editing. This way, you can plan the placements, title screens you might need if you choose to use them, and any other graphics you want to be included.

Once you’re ready to edit, choose the film editing software that works best for you! Editing is the most important part of this process, so follow along and mention some things to keep in mind while editing.

Cut out the Quiet and Redundancies

Before editing, watch your footage fully through. Here you’ll begin editing and cutting out pieces like long moments of silence, mistakes made while filming, or repetitive steps.

Adding Elements

From there, decide what elements you want to include in your video. Think of photos, captions, and graphics. Next, consider what background sounds or music you’d like to include. When we have those times without speech, having fun and simple themed music in the background can keep viewers interested. Make sure to choose music that matches the tone of your video! For example, if you’re creating a summery project, look for background music that is more pop than somber.

Next, when adding transitions and video effects, focus on being cohesive! Using multiple types of transitions can make your videos look clunky, so it’s best to find the transitions you’re comfortable with and use those in your videos.

Placing Your Intro and Outro

Place these in your video if you choose to film your intro and outro post-production! Videos give a complete feeling when they have a direct opening and closing, so we recommend having fun with it and creating a guideline you can follow when creating. Whether this includes a common intro phrase, placing your logo, promoting the pattern you’re working on, or something more personal, these two elements will elevate your video!

Staying Consistent

Consistency builds a following! To create a consistent aesthetic for your videos, plan out and design certain pieces that will be repeatedly used.

  • Thumbnail Image Templates that can be edited to fit new videos
  • Color themes for graphics and slides
  • Font choices
  • Logo

Editing Tools

If you’re unsure which editing applications to choose from, we’ve placed a few recommendations for beginner video editors. As you learn new techniques and skills, you’ll be able to upgrade your editing software for more detailed editing.

  • Apple iMovie: If you’re an apple owner, we recommend apple iMovie! Easy for beginners to use and with features more advanced creators can enjoy, Apple IMovie allows you to create seamless videos, add in elements and music, and if you’re an apple user will directly link with your images and music. For those who purchase a Mac, this application is free.
  • Animaker: an online video editor, this application is perfect for creating simple videos using drag and drop. With no editing experience to work the application, you can easily place music, videos, text, and photos. However, unlike iMovie, this application costs a monthly fee and can range from $10 to $49, depending on your needs.
  • Corel Video Studio: a one-time purchase application for $99, this video editing software is perfect for those who plan to upgrade their video editing skills in the future. Simple to use, this software has everything you’ll find in the previous ones, as well as clean motion tracking. This means you can have the video track specific objects throughout the editing process and place an element like an arrow pointing to a particular spot or blurring.
  • Final Cut Pro: Another Apple product, Final Cut Pro, is a one-time purchase editing program offering a more advanced editing experience than iMovie. Final Cut Pro allows creators to edit professionally finished videos, including a library of transitions, title slides, a music library, and more. This program is an excellent option for those who feel they have mastered the iMovie program or are up to a new challenge!
  • Adobe Premiere: if you plan to work with a team or immerse yourself in video editing techniques, Adobe Premiere Pro is one of the top choices. This program offers many features, including team organization with online elements and Photoshop and After Effects. It is perfect for those who plan to create videos often and want to upgrade their skills. Adobe does require a monthly subscription for usage.

Exporting and Publishing

Now that you have a finished video and are ready to publish let’s talk about the export process. The best file format to export your video is MP4. This file can then work and present a clean video on your social platforms, website, and YouTube.

As for publishing, you need to plan where this will be posted, and how it will be published (a blog, a post, a reel) and focus on how you’ll promote the new video. Depending on where you post is, what dimensions your video will be, what time length the video can be, and what direction the video will lay (vertical for YouTube or horizontal for TikTok,) is how you’ll choose the site location.

Plan the description your video posts will have, what eye-grabbing title you’ll place, and how you’ll share this new video with your audience. For example, if you have a new project video releasing for a holiday pattern, you can create a story, post, and newsletter to promote the new video to viewers.

Once you begin video recording and editing, you’ll see what aspects your audience likes, doesn’t like, and want more of! From there, the process changes until you find your direction and routine where the audience keeps returning.

Now that you have an idea of where to begin, we hope this helps you plan your video ideas, find the right filming tools, and encourage you to try something new! Remember, this can all start with a free editing application on your phone, camera, and an idea; everyone begins somewhere.

Looking for ideas? Check out our JUKI Youtube page here today! Offering how-to’s, behind scenes, projects and so much more!